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Image: Office of Congressman Mike Quigley

5/22/17

Military veterans have a higher unemployment rate than nonveterans, according to federal statistics. One reason may be that when veterans seek civilian jobs, they often face stereotypes from hiring managers. But another set of stereotypes may come into play as well: Veterans fall prey to their own preconceptions about certain types of jobs, and miss out on promising opportunities.

(Blue and) White hats: Penn State launches bug bounty program
Image: Penn State

5/18/17

Thanks to the efforts of a recent graduate from the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST), Penn State is preparing to launch a pilot program where students can identify and report cyber vulnerabilities.

Approved students will soon be able to enroll in the Student Vulnerability Reporting Program (SVRP), where they can scour some Penn State systems in search of vulnerabilities. In addition to earning hands-on experience with cybersecurity and helping maintain the integrity of Penn State’s networks, students will also be rewarded with LionCash and awards if their efforts are successful. Michael Lubas, who graduated in May with a degree in security and risk analysis (SRA), was the driving force behind the program. He first explored the idea during his IST 440W class. The course, taught by Alison Murphy, focuses on problem-based approaches to real-life issues facing organizations. 

ST seniors Damian Salonick, Kathleen Beck, Wares Farighi, Harrison Goniprow, Chris Jacobs, and Cameron McDaniel discuss their IST 440W project.
Image: Jordan Ford

5/17/17

Through his involvement with the President’s Commission on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Equity at Penn State, Damian Salonick learned that the commission wanted to improve the digital presence of all the LGBTQ organizations at Penn State. With several organizations and events serving their community, they needed a central hub to reach faculty, staff and students.

It was a serendipitous moment for the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) senior because he was currently enrolled in IST 440W, a class offering a problem-based approach to technology integration by focusing on real-life problems faced by an organization. Salonick’s team was searching for an organization that fit this description, and they found one in the commission.

History 197, "The History of Penn State," will examine the history of Penn State from its founding as the Farmers' High School in 1855 to its evolution as one of the nation's leading research universities.
Image: Penn State archives

5/15/17

A course examining the history of Penn State from its founding as the Farmers' High School in 1855 to its evolution as one of the nation's leading research universities will be offered for the first time this fall.

History 197, “The History of Penn State,” will chronicle and evaluate changes that have taken place at Penn State over the past 160 years and explore them in the context of larger historical and socio-economic developments in American higher education during that time. In particular, the course will study the conduct, leadership, and educational vision of notable Penn State presidents, faculty, alumni and coaches; dimensions of student life (including student protest); race and gender relations; athletics; and the challenges of University life, research and admissions in the post-World War II era.

Carrel Reid, graduate from the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) in 2016
Image: Google

5/15/17

Five months before Carrel Reid was set to graduate from the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) in 2016, he began applying for jobs.

“I applied to a countless number of IT jobs in New York City, and I was thinking about where to apply next,” Reid said. Though he didn’t have plans to relocate to the west coast, he found himself “sitting there looking at the Google search page and I thought to myself ‘why not?'”

Angela Miller, director of recruiting for the College of Information Sciences and Technology, addresses prospective students on April 8.
Image: Erin Cassidy Hendrick

5/10/17

 Faculty, staff and students in the Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) gathered on April 8 for the inaugural “Women in Blue” celebration, where newly admitted female students from around the country were able to experience the college’s commitment to empowering women in the technology field.

Following an Accepted Students Program on campus, guests joined the “Women in IST” (WIST) student group to attend a resource fair in the HUB-Robeson Center, which highlighted the opportunities and support resources available to Penn State students. Attendees then spent the afternoon in the IST Building participating in coding, logic, and critical-thinking activities led by WIST and Girls Who Code. The evening concluded with a reception and dinner for guests and their families, featuring remarks from women in IST and other speakers.

Stan Aungst, center, with Travis Richner, left, and Dan Supko.
Image: Penn State

5/08/17

From serving in Vietnam at age 19 to earning his doctorate at 52, Stan Aungst's life has played out differently than he initially planned.

Upon being drafted a year out of high school in 1966 to serve with the Army during the Vietnam War, Aungst trained and served as a field cryptographer, sending and deciphering messages via the electromagnetic spectrum on the battlefield in East and Southeast Asia. “I’m lucky to be alive,” Aungst said about serving in the war. “It changed my whole life.”

Jan Mahar Sturdevant
Image: Penn State

5/08/17

Jan Mahar Sturdevant, senior lecturer of information sciences and technology (IST) at Penn State, is retiring after 17 years with the college. During her career, she has taught a variety of courses at IST; the Rady School of Business at the University of California, San Diego; and Portland State University’s doctoral program in engineering technology management. She also was the recipient of the 2014-15 McMurtry Award for her work to provide an exceptional learning experience in the online environment for undergraduates.

However, Sturdevant considers her most impactful work the creation of the Tech Savvy Camp, a major initiative to educate economically disadvantaged middle school girls on STEM careers. “It completely rocked the school, no one had done it before,” she said.

Nine graduate students from the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) recently gathered in Washington, D.C., for the Grad Cohort Workshop sponsored by the Computing Research Association for Women (CRA-W). The conference aims to increase the ranks of senior women in computing-related studies and research by building and mentoring communities of women during their graduate studies.
Image: Penn State

5/05/17

While the field of computer science has been growing exponentially, companies and universities are eagerly searching for women to fill these crucial roles. To help meet this demand, nine graduate students from the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) recently gathered in Washington, D.C., for the Grad Cohort Workshop sponsored by the Computing Research Association for Women (CRA-W). The conference aims to increase the ranks of senior women in computing-related studies and research by building and mentoring communities of women during their graduate studies.

Christy Grim quit her job to take an internship in the information technology field.
Image: Christy Grim

5/05/17

Christy Grim took a big risk in 2015, quitting her job as an optician to take an internship she hoped would lead to a career in information technology.

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