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“Driving Digital Innovation” will be the topic of the next in a series of public forums focused on implementing the University’s multi-year Strategic Plan.
Image: Penn State

3/27/17

"Driving Digital Innovation” will be the topic of the next in a series of public forums focused on implementing the University’s multi-year Strategic Plan. The forum will take place 1-2:30 p.m. March 30 at Penn State Behrend in  Burke Building, room 180.

Faculty, staff and students from across the University are invited to participate, either in person or via livestream. To watch via livestream, go to the event page online: strategicplan.psu.edu/events/behrend-033017.

James Wang and Reginald Adams discussing a new patent that takes the next step in computer learning techniques in the hopes that computers can one day understand the complex realm of human feelings.
Image: Jessica Sallurday

3/27/17

A new patent awarded to a Penn State team led by James Wang, professor in the College of Information Sciences and Technology; Reginald Adams, associate professor of psychology in the College of the Liberal Arts; Jia Li, professor of statistics in the Eberly College of Science; and Michelle Newman, professor of psychology, takes the next step in computer learning techniques in the hopes that computers can one day understand the complex realm of human feelings.

IST students on alternative spring break pose in front of the Microsoft Headquarters.
Image: Penn State

3/24/17

Early this March, students from Penn State's College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) traded bathing suits for business suits when they traveled to Seattle, Washington, for an alternative spring break. During their trip, the group visited some of the most influential technology companies in the country. 

Eight students, all freshmen, spent five days visiting powerhouse companies such as Microsoft, Google, Boeing, Amazon, and Kaiser Permanente, where they engaged in Q&A sessions with technology staff and toured their offices and facilities. While the trip, sponsored by the College of IST, included an exploration of Seattle and some of its most prominent attractions, the most engaging part of the trip for students was learning how to leverage their IST education to become valuable additions to today’s technology workforce.


Image: Centre County PAWS

3/23/17

Students in the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) know the integration of technology into our everyday lives creates unique challenges that require critical problem-solving skills. For students enrolled in IST 331, a course focused on the foundations of designing information systems with the needs of the end-user in mind, they are earning experience that is directly translatable to their future careers by reviewing and suggesting changes to existing websites.

Led by Frank Ritter, professor of information sciences and technology and the course’s instructor, students in the course act as information technology consultants, reviewing the data, theories, and analytic techniques related to how users interact with information systems. 

Gerry Santoro, senior lecturer in information sciences and technology (IST)
Image: Penn State

3/20/17

Gerry Santoro, senior lecturer in information sciences and technology (IST) and assistant professor of communications arts and sciences, will be presenting a lecture on strategies to protect your online identity. The event is free and open to the public.

The event, beginning at 7:45 p.m. on March 22 in Room 113 of the IST building, is called “Protecting Your Privacy Online: Some Practical Tips.” During his lecture, Santoro will cover the use of search engines, email programs, encryption disks and cloud computing in an effort to empower individuals to help protect their own data.

Retiring professor Michael McNeese on a recent trip to Hawaii.
Image: Michael McNe

3/17/17

 Michael McNeese, tenured professor of information sciences and technology (IST) and one of the College of IST’s founding faculty members, is tying up loose ends before his retirement from Penn State.

McNeese was hired in August 2000, just one year after the college was established in 1999.

Joe Oakes, senior instructor of information sciences and technology at Penn State Abington, in Chennai, India.
Image: Penn State

3/15/17

Two Penn State Abington faculty members spent spring break in Nepal and India on an exploratory trip to develop an information sciences and technology course that includes a required short-term study abroad component.  

 

The State College Municipal building in downtown State College.
Image: Jessica Sallurday

3/08/17

Today, technology touches almost every aspect of people’s lives. But outside of social media, it can often be difficult to translate this influence to a person’s civic life within their local community. “In a sense, we’re all facing this problem with government that people are less and less involved and empowered in local decision-making,” said Guoray Cai, assistant professor at the Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST).

Umer Farooq, user research manager at Facebook on the Messenger team.
Image: Penn State

3/03/17

“Fifty years ago, a notable technologist predicted three stages for humans and computers. First, human-computer interaction where computers are tools and extensions of the arm, eye and brain. Second, computer symbiosis, the coupling of humans and computers thinking together. Third, ultra-intelligent machines that dominate humans in analysis and tasks. Where are we now?

"When you asked why teens didn't talk to their parents, a lot of times they mention risky situations, which they didn't think were a big deal, but they add that if they told their parents, they would just freak out and make things worse,"
Image: © iStock Photo Highwaystarz-Photography

2/28/17

"When you asked why teens didn't talk to their parents, a lot of times they mention risky situations, which they didn't think were a big deal, but they add that if they told their parents, they would just freak out and make things worse," Wisniewski said.

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